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Customer Success, Take Two

September 14, 2017

ti·ger /ˈtīɡər/ – used to refer to someone fierce, determined, or ambitious.

Or…used to define tenacious Customer Success Managers, as we described in an earlier blog post, If Customer Success had a spirit animal, what would it be?

Tenacity is typically paired with another admirable and courageous quality – the drive to succeed and to reap even better results with each new endeavor. In my experience, tackling something new can be fun because the feeling of the “unknown” is challenging and exciting. But every new attempt becomes more and more gratifying as you use what you’ve learned to improve.

Like when building up Customer Success organizations, for example – as our very own Jennifer Dearman, VP of Global Customer Success at Kronos, Catherine Blackmore, Global VP of Customer Success at Oracle, and Rachel Orston, CEO of User IQ, discussed at the 2017 Pulse Conference presented by Gainsight.

Pulse 2017

In this 30 minute session, Customer Success, Take Two – What I Learned Building My Customer Success Team Again, Jennifer, Catherine, and Rachel delve into a compelling discussion on the victories and lessons learned from their time in the world of Customer Success. Here’s a quick sneak peek at the discussion questions:

  • How has Customer Success evolved over the past couple of years?
  • How do you take what you’ve learned and craft a plan?
  • What are the data challenges when trying to get one source of truth across customers?

So – What’s the first step in building your Customer Success team?

Creating a plan and engaging the right people. The session highlights an interesting statistic, that 90% of any plan will fail without an engaged executive. It’s important to plan for the plan, so to speak. Customer Success starts with a mission – a company-wide mission to better align functional areas and transform the customer experience. And you must have the right people onboard to invest in an organization focused on a maturity model to give it life.

And what’s one of the lessons learned?

Based on her experience in the industry, Jennifer says that underfunding Success Ops teams is one of the most damaging oversights. They are the backbone, and without their full support, replicating the success process and continuing to deliver value to customers is a challenging feat.

Watch the full session recording for more insight on starting your own Customer Success organization!

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